New SACN guidelines recommend daily 10 micrograms intake of Vitamin D

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) has published a report advising that anybody aged over one year should have a vitamin D intake of 10 micrograms (mcg) a day throughout the year.

Food sources of vitamin D

The report has been prepared after the Department of Health requested in 2010 that the SACN review whether the recommendations for vitamin D intake that were set in 1991 are still appropriate.

The SACN looked at a growing body of evidence over the last five years that links vitamin D to musculoskeletal health.

This is a change in advice, previously we have said that babies from six months to five years should have a supplement and only those people at risk of deficiency should take a supplement,”

Louis Levy, head of nutrition science at Public Health England.

The SACN now advise that anybody aged one year or older consumes 10 mcg of vitamin D per day and that all infants from birth, up to one year of age, should consume between 8.5 mcg and 10 mcg per day.

The recommended intakes refer to dietary sources including natural food, fortified foods and supplements. They also refer to average intake over time, such as one week, and account for variations in vitamin D intake from day to day.

The main role vitamin D plays in the body is to regulate calcium and phosphate levels, which are essential to bone, teeth and muscle health.

In extreme cases of deficiency, children can develop rickets, a condition where the bones become soft and misshapen as they grow. In adults, deficiency can lead to osteomalacia, a condition that causes severe muscle and bone pain.

Limited amounts of vitamin D are available in foods such as eggs and oily fish, but for the majority of people, the vitamin is made from the action of sunlight on the skin and experts estimate that 20% of children and 17% of adults in England may have a deficiency.

Public health officials recommend that during seasons where sun exposure is limited, people should consider supplements as a source of vitamin D if their diet is unlikely to provide enough.

Sources

Sally Robertson

Written by

Sally Robertson

Sally has a Bachelor's Degree in Biomedical Sciences (B.Sc.). She is a specialist in reviewing and summarising the latest findings across all areas of medicine covered in major, high-impact, world-leading international medical journals, international press conferences and bulletins from governmental agencies and regulatory bodies. At News-Medical, Sally generates daily news features, life science articles and interview coverage.

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Comments

  1. Walter Gaier Walter Gaier United States says:

    Dangerous to be so sloppy with mg and ug! Recommend to correct this immediately!!

  2. John Henderson John Henderson Canada says:

    mg is the abbreviation for milligram.

    The abbreviation for microgram is mcg or µg.

    Despite having spelled out microgram in the fist sentence mistakes like this can still lead to unhealthy or even dangerous misinterpretations of articles.

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
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