World-first 3D scanning technology could enable earlier detection of skin cancer

Queenslanders could have skin cancer diagnosed earlier using world-first 3D scanning technology with the launch of the Australian Cancer Research Foundation Australian Centre of Excellence in Melanoma Imaging and Diagnosis.

University of Queensland Dermatologist Professor H. Peter Soyer said the technology enabled researchers to track moles and skin spots over time using full body mapping, making it a game-changer for melanoma detection.

This technology is revolutionizing early melanoma detection using 3D state-of-the-art body imaging systems that take an image in milliseconds.

The telemedicine network allows dermatologists and medical professionals to detect skin cancers remotely, even from the other side of the country.

For the first time, medical researchers can access a national database of up to 100,000 patient images taken by 3D full body imaging systems located in Queensland, NSW and Victoria, as part of the world's largest melanoma imaging trial, which aims to develop more efficient and effective screening for the early detection of skin cancer.

Using algorithms created by artificial intelligence, the 3D imaging systems are able to analyze the images and produce a full body skin spot map, which transforms the way we will monitor patients in the future."

Professor H. Peter Soyer, Dermatologist, University of Queensland

Australia has the highest rates of melanoma in the world with an average 28,000 Australians diagnosed with the disease every year.

ACRF chief executive officer Kerry Strydom said the Australian Cancer Research Foundation backed the best in research and cutting-edge technology to drive innovation and help create the new Centre.

"Melanoma is a deadly problem that needs disruptive solutions, and ACRF is proud to be to be involved in delivering revolutionary research through this pioneering program," Mr Strydom said.

The project brings together three leading Australian universities in skin research, UQ, The University of Sydney and Melbourne's Monash University, to form the interconnected Centre of Excellence in Diagnostic Imaging of Early Melanoma.

Queenslanders can sign up here to be part of the world's largest melanoma imaging trial using the 3D full body imaging system located at Brisbane's Princess Alexandra Hospital.

The 3D technology is expected to be rolled out to five other regions across Queensland.

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