Newly identified gene signature helps assess cancer risk and optimize treatment

NewsGuard 100/100 Score

In a paper published in PNAS, Maureen Murphy, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Wistar's Ellen and Ronald Caplan Cancer Center and Ira Brind Professor and Program Leader in the Molecular & Cellular Oncogenesis Program, and team have identified a gene signature that accurately predicts the functioning of P53 variants, important information to assessing cancer risk and optimizing choices for cancer therapeutics.

There are so many genetic variants of P53. A lot of P53 variants are classified as having uncertain significance with current methods of testing. This does not help people determine whether they have increased cancer risk. The signature we identified does."

Maureen Murphy, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Wistar's Ellen and Ronald Caplan Cancer Center and Ira Brind Professor and Program Leader in the Molecular & Cellular Oncogenesis Program

The Murphy lab monitored differences in activity in mutant and normal p53 proteins to determine any genetic markers that would flag if a p53 variant is functioning less than normal. In collaboration with Andrew Kossenkov, Ph.D., assistant professor in Wistar's Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center, the research team used machine learning to identify a gene signature that consistently and accurately predicted the difference between a normal functioning or benign p53 and a lower functioning variant of the protein.

This knowledge could be used to screen individuals with genetic variants of p53 and better inform them of their cancer risk and response to therapy. Murphy intends to continue this work with the goal of turning the gene signature into a blood-based genetic test someone could take to learn about their p53 status.

"The promise of this research is personalized medicine," Murphy elaborated. "This work could not have happened in any other place except Wistar where our environment is so collaborative and cutting edge."

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
New microfluidic device improves the separation of tumor cells and clusters from malignant effusions