Proteostasis Therapeutics to use GeneGo's MetaCore integrated software

GeneGo, Inc., the leading systems biology tools company, announced today that Proteostasis Therapeutics has licensed its data mining and analysis platform, MetaCore. Proteostasis Therapeutics is the first company dedicated to the discovery of novel small molecule therapeutics based upon understanding the body's Proteostasis Network. The Proteostasis Network maintains the body's natural balance of proteins to protect us from numerous diseases. Deficiencies of the Proteostasis Network can lead to a wide spectrum of diseases, such as emphysema, type II diabetes, Alzheimer's Disease and Huntington's Disease. GeneGo's MetaCore is developing pathway reconstruction maps for a number of disease categories, including neurodegenerative disorders. Disease-specific pathway maps and models can be used as analytical tools to help advance our understanding of the diseases, their mechanisms and processes to help find cures faster.

"We are very pleased to add Proteostasis as a new customer as we work towards delivering our unique disease specific platforms," said Julie Bryant, GeneGo's VP of Business development. "Understanding and capturing disease pathways is one of our top development priorities, and we are glad to see it appreciated by drug discovery companies."

"Proteostasis Therapeutics is building a proprietary platform to rapidly translate the emerging knowledge of how the Proteostasis Network functions to discover novel small molecules, and GeneGo's MetaCore integrated software suite is a valuable tool in these efforts," said Hui Ge, Ph.D., Head of Systems Biology at Proteostasis Therapeutics. "We are pleased with GeneGo's comprehensive curated database of protein interactions, which enables us to rapidly use this information in our Proteostasis Network characterization efforts."

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