Enzo Biochem to unveil data on AmpiProbe HCV assay at ESCMID meeting

Enzo Biochem Inc. (NYSE: ENZ) announced today that the company will present for the first time peer-reviewed data on detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) using its novel AmpiProbe™ technology platform, which provides low cost and high sensitivity real-time nucleic acid amplification assays. The data will be unveiled at the upcoming meeting of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), scheduled for March 31-April 3 in London.

The abstract, "Quantitative Detection of HCV RNA in Human Plasma-Serum using the Enzo AmpiProbe™ HCV RNA Assay," has been accepted for publication in Clinical Microbiology and Infection, the official ESCMID journal. In addition, Enzo will seek CE-IVD (Conformité Européenne in vitro diagnostic) designation for the company's HCV RNA assay, enabling the company to market the product as a diagnostic in the European Union.

Poised as a significant new entry in the market, the AmpiProbe™ HCV assay facilitates paneling - or multiple tests per single sample, thereby requiring less sample for each test. In addition, the HCV assay utilizes highly efficient technology that employs less reaction volume.

"The AmpiProbe™ HCV assay provides a superior testing methodology through greater operational efficiency and economy than any similar platform currently on the market, and we are pleased to be able to present it at the highly prestigious ESCMID meeting," said Barry Weiner, Enzo President. "By providing overall cost savings in reagents and sample processing, the HCV assay is positioned to benefit physicians as well as patients. We believe that this assay represents the beginning of a new generation of nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics."

Source:

 Enzo Biochem

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