The app that warns you about snacks you can’t add to your shopping cart

Researchers have developed an app that scans the barcodes of food items in the supermarket and warns you if it is not suitable for your body, based on your DNA. The app, which is called DnaNudge, can be installed on a smartphone or worn as an electronic bracelet-like device.

AllergyAfrica Studio | Shutterstock

The app can predict diabetes, heart disease and allergies to peanuts, and more, all based on the DNA of the user. It then discourages the user from buying food items containing these elements.

The DNA test is carried out using saliva and can predict if the wearer is sensitive to salt, fat, carbohydrates or caffeine. When the wearer shops at a supermarket, the device can scan the barcodes of the items and flashes red when the wearer picks up a food item that may prove dangerous. A green signal means that the food item is safe for the user.

DnaNudge and the corresponding wearable device has been designed and created by researchers at the Imperial College London, with support from Claire Murdoch, national director for mental health at NHS England and Chief Executive of the Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust.

Murdoch wants this device to be routinely prescribed by general practitioners. At present the device is undergoing trials in London on actual type 2 diabetics and those with certain mental health conditions.

It’s just well-known clinical evidence that if you’ve got the gene for cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure, you have to avoid salt. If you’ve got the gene for obesity then saturated fat is very important. If you’ve got the gene for type 2 diabetes then saturated fat and salt are culprits”.

Professor Chris Toumazou, Lead Designer of DnaNudge

Source:

https://www.dnanudge.com/en/DnaNudge-App

Dr. Ananya Mandal

Written by

Dr. Ananya Mandal

Dr. Ananya Mandal is a doctor by profession, lecturer by vocation and a medical writer by passion. She specialized in Clinical Pharmacology after her bachelor's (MBBS). For her, health communication is not just writing complicated reviews for professionals but making medical knowledge understandable and available to the general public as well.

Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Mandal, Ananya. (2019, June 19). The app that warns you about snacks you can’t add to your shopping cart. News-Medical. Retrieved on October 23, 2019 from https://www.news-medical.net/news/20190312/The-app-that-warns-you-about-snacks-you-cane28099t-add-to-your-shopping-cart.aspx.

  • MLA

    Mandal, Ananya. "The app that warns you about snacks you can’t add to your shopping cart". News-Medical. 23 October 2019. <https://www.news-medical.net/news/20190312/The-app-that-warns-you-about-snacks-you-cane28099t-add-to-your-shopping-cart.aspx>.

  • Chicago

    Mandal, Ananya. "The app that warns you about snacks you can’t add to your shopping cart". News-Medical. https://www.news-medical.net/news/20190312/The-app-that-warns-you-about-snacks-you-cane28099t-add-to-your-shopping-cart.aspx. (accessed October 23, 2019).

  • Harvard

    Mandal, Ananya. 2019. The app that warns you about snacks you can’t add to your shopping cart. News-Medical, viewed 23 October 2019, https://www.news-medical.net/news/20190312/The-app-that-warns-you-about-snacks-you-cane28099t-add-to-your-shopping-cart.aspx.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post